The student news site of Wayzata High School
  • Wayzata 50: Special Issue
    • Maddy Torres
    • Mia Kelly
    • Isabella Perrigo
    • Aleythea Adams
    • Phil Ableidinger
    • Rafael McCraney
    • Hans Torgerson
    • Sam Peterson

Wayzata 50: The Special Issue (continued)

January 3, 2018

To Be a Model

Photo+courtesy+of+Maddy+Torres
Photo courtesy of Maddy Torres

Photo courtesy of Maddy Torres

Photo courtesy of Maddy Torres

  Senior Maddy Torres has been used to the camera for almost her entire life. Since the age of three, Torres has been modeling.
  “When I was three my mom just sent my picture into an agency and I got connected to one right away,” said Torres. The agency that  Torres models for is called Agency Models and Talent.
  According to Torres, she has modeled for Target, Shop NBC, Bass Pro Shops, Gopher Sports, and Aveda.
  “The type of modeling I focus on is promotional modeling, and commercial and advertising modeling,” said Torres.
  According to Torres, as a junior she modeled for Aveda, which was a competition for workers from Aveda to promote hairstyles and make-up. These photos were posted on Aveda’s instagram account with roughly 245,000 followers.
 While the modeling gig for Aveda was more promotional, Torres’ modeling job
for Target was commercial, as she was put in catalogs and pictures throughout the Target stores.
  Torres said that one of the most important aspects of modeling is finding an agency that you are interested in. Some agencies only focus on body types, or hair.
  “It really depends on what you value,” said Torres.
  According to Torres the process of becoming a model is fairly simple, but it’s not for everyone. The process includes going to an audition while the company or agency takes several photos of you, and records your body type and hair type. After the audition, you wait for a call back. Once you get a call back from your agency, you just have to wait for them to contact you about potential jobs.
  “If you don’t hear from your agency for a while, you can always reach out,” said Torres, “But a big part of modeling is a waiting game.”
  Along with occasionally having to wait for a modeling job, Torres said that one of the most difficult parts of modeling is the stressful environment, which comes with a lot of pressure.
  “Modeling for Aveda was kind of stressful because it was a competition, and all the stylists were constantly changing my make-up and hair,” said Torres.
  Despite the occasional stressful environment, Torres said vthat modeling is rewarding.
  “When I did the commercial for Bass Pro Shops promoting a 2017 Speed Boat, I got to ski all weekend and basically got paid to hang out at the lake,” Torres said.
  Torres also enjoys the overall aspect of modeling.
  “My favorite part is having a ton of professionals turn you into someone other than what you look like on the average day,” said Torres, “There’s something about it that makes you feel very professional.”
  Although Torres does love modeling, she has other plans for her future.
  “Modeling will always be something I do on the side,” said Torres.

Kung Fu Kelly

Photo+courtesy+of+Mia+Kelly
Photo courtesy of Mia Kelly

Photo courtesy of Mia Kelly

Photo courtesy of Mia Kelly

  Sophomore Mia Kelly started taking Chinese culture classes at the age of four. According to Kelly, when she was younger, learning Chinese was a family choice, but now she chooses to do it on her own. She took a break during middle school because of her workload, but decided to start again during high school, and participates inside and outside of school, according to Kelly. Kelly is currently taking Chinese 2 at the high school. “Mia persuses her passion of her own heritage by participating in Chinese cultural activities. She learns Chinese dance and performs to celebrate the Chinese New Year every year since elementary school,” said Wayzata High School Chinese teacher Sheen Heng Zhang.
  In her Chinese classes that take place at Cretin-Derham Hall High School, Kelly learns about various forms of the traditional Chinese language.
  The classes also teach her about weapons and how to fight with them. “My favorite part about taking Chinese classes is learning how to use the various weapons,” said Kelly.
  Kelly said she has learned how to use the staff, fan, knife, straight sword, spear, and is currently working on learning how to use the tiger hooks. Kelly participates in Chinese dance as well at the Twin Cities Chinese Dance Center in Downtown Wayzata, a non-profit performing arts and educational organization
that promotes Chinese culture, according to the Twin Cities Chinese Dance Center website.
  Kelly also takes part in organizing and dancing in the Dances of Joy show at St. Catherine University located in St. Paul, which takes place after the Chinese New Year.
  “The event consists of a large number of individual dance numbers that are performed by various classes at the dance school,” said Kelly. “Dances can range from short stories within the numbers to just simply painting a picture like waves or clouds through dance” said Kelly.
  Kelly participates in kung fu classes held in Savage, Minnesota. According to Kelly, these classes are set up where one progresses through belts to advance to
the next level. There are three main focuses of the belt classes: forms, kicks, and self defense.
  Currently, she is in a weapons and sparring class, which focuses on how to fight and use Chinese weapons. According to Kelly, all the time she has dedicated to these classes has gotten Kelly to a 3rd level black belt.
  Outside of Chinese, Kelly is also involved in Club YES and was in Mary Poppins that took place at the high school.
  Kelly will also be going on the China trip this summer to learn more about the Chinese culture and language. “I cannot compliment Mia enough for being a truly global citizen,” said Heng Zhang.

Cello, it’s Me

Photo+by+Drew+Smith
Photo by Drew Smith

Photo by Drew Smith

Photo by Drew Smith

  Isabella Perrigo joined the Central Middle School orchestra in sixth grade, as
Perrigo puts it, “I always just liked the fact that I could sit down.” Since then, it has grown into a passion that has taken her outside of the school sponsored program.
  Most recently, Perrigo performed at “Wayzata Idol”, playing the cello for Julia Robley’s rendition of “Symphony” by Zara Larsson.
  “I knew that Isabella was passionate about the cello and very talented as well,” said Robley. “I thought [she] would be a perfect fit.”
  This year, Isabella auditioned for the Minnesota Youth Symphony (MYS) after four years of playing through the school. “It’s a music program where people get the chance to work in a symphonic setting,” says Perrigo.
  MYS requires auditions before accepting any students into the symphony, and according to Perrigo, they’re fairly rigorous. “I had to prepare a solo, a pre chosen excerpt, scales and rhythm work, and bthen had to sight-read a piece in the audition.”
  MYS performs at a state-level. Most recently, Isabella had a concert at the Minnesota Orchestra Hall. “It was so cool to be able to play from that stage in such an amazing place.”
  Isabella made the decision to switch from the school’s orchestra over to MYS this year, saying “With MYS, I had the opportunity to play with other classes of instruments (brass, winds, percussion). MYS seemed to be a better fit.” Wayzata’s orchestra program only includes string instruments such as violins, violas, cellos and basses.
  Perrigo’s next MYS performance will be on December 9 at Rosedale Shopping
Center, for a “Play-a-thon”. “We’re raising money for the program, so every orchestra is taking a shift playing for a few hours” said Perrigo.

Something to Smile Back On

Photo+courtesy+of+Aleythea+Adams
Photo courtesy of Aleythea Adams

Photo courtesy of Aleythea Adams

Photo courtesy of Aleythea Adams

  For Senior Aleythea Adams, life has always surrounded by the arts. From piano, to choir, to theatre, to drawing, Adams does it all.
  According to Adams, the past two years have been heavily choir-focused. Concert Choir and Chambers, the top two choirs in the school, take a priority in her schedule. “I love it and strive to be better,” said Adams.
  “We get assigned songs in Chambers and must come back with the music memorized. I like to listen to the pieces we do in class. It helps me get a better understanding,” said Adams.
  According to Adams, she has had roles in productions like The Nutcracker and Cinderella.
  “Dance was a passion of mine, but it became difficult to keep up with the expenses,” said Adams. Even though it was a tough decision, she discontinued dance for her junior year, according to Adams.
  “By not doing dance, a lot of time opened up for me to do theater,” said Adams. Last year, she participated in her first musical, Thoroughly Modern Millie, according to Adams.
  “Theater is beautiful. Everyone is passionate, driven, and talented,” said Adams. “Theater is something I can look back on with a smile.”
  If presented the opportunity, she plans on continuing theater in college, according to Adams.
  “I usually don’t go to lunch, just so I can play piano in the choir room,” said Adams.
  After school, Adams has theatre from 3:00 P.M. to 6:30 or 7:00 P.M. Following theatre is chambers choir from six to eight in the evening. Adams is taking Advanced Drawing and plans to move on to AP drawing next semester.
  “I am so busy that sometimes I push art to the side. Taking classes in school allows me to continue to work on art,” said Adams.
  Currently, Adams is teaching herself guitar and piano. “One of my friends randomly gifted me a guitar and I decided to accept the challenge,” said Adams.

Good Morning, Mr. President

Photo+by+Quinn+Malisow
Photo by Quinn Malisow

Photo by Quinn Malisow

Photo by Quinn Malisow

  Like many students, Junior Phil Ableidinger was interested in the political
events unfolding in America.
  However, Ableidinger took his interest one step further than most: He ran for president.
  “In 9th grade, someone bet me a cookie I wouldn’t do it. From there it became a movement,” said Ableidinger.
  In order to get on the ballot and become president you have to be 35 years
old. There are no age requirements to file paperwork and begin a campaign, according to the United States Constitution.
  According to Ableidinger, he gathered a campaign team of 20 classmates and got to work spreading his message.
  “My main goal was to increase representation by youth in government,”  said Ableidinger.
  “We’re not having the level of youth engagement that we need to make a difference in our country.”
  “[A reporter] came into the school to do a huge news segment and interviewed
me and a few others on my team,” said Ableidinger.
  “Right now I’m working on youth engagement with Tim Walz for governor.
I’ve also worked with Keith Ellison, Peggy Flanagan, and a couple others,” said Ableidinger.
  According to Ableidinger, he mostly worked on outreach and staff events during the campaign.
  “Most higher level positions require a college degree so I’ve been working
on outreach at every campaign I’ve worked at,” mentioned Ableidinger
  “Even high level campaign work isn’t fun,” Ableidinger said, “It’s tedious and takes a lot of effort.”
  According to Ableidinger, he was surprised at the way the 2016 elections played out.
   “I know a ton of people including my boss were expecting a job in the
Clinton administration. I don’t think anybody on the team actually gave Trump a chance.”
  According to Ableidinger, he traveled to Washington over the summer to work with the official youth arm of the Democratic Party, The Young Democrats of America.
  “I absolutely love being involved in politics, it’s a huge way to make a difference,” said Ableidinger.
  According to Ableidinger, he’s unsure of whether he’d want to be a candidate again in the future.
  “Even though I love politics, I don’t know I’d want to major in it or work in it for the rest of my life,” said Ableidinger.

Picture This!

  Sophomore Rafael McCraney is a photographer that loves taking pictures
because, according to McCraney, it allows him to showcase people’s’ true beauty.
  According to McCraney, he found his passion for photography about two years ago when his mom discovered his hidden talent in the mountains of Colorado.
  “At the time, I didn’t have a hobby. I took a leap of faith with photography, and I started pursuing it seriously at the beginning of freshman year,” said McCraney.
  After spending about two years with a digital camera, according to McCraney, he’s going to switch over to film. “I recently bought a film camera and I’m super
excited. I really like the vintage look of it. The pictures look so real,” said McCraney.
  “Something about not editing a picture and it just coming out the way you want it to. It looks really good,” said McCraney. “With film, it’s not something I do to it, it’s about having a great time and place and it works.”
  According to McCraney, he loves photography because pictures portray life as “frozen in time” and a moment can be captured forever. “Photographs capture a moment that you may not remember otherwise,” said McCraney.
  For the most part, McCraney works with people. “I take pictures to help people find their true beauty,” said McCraney. According to McCraney, he likes to show
the people he takes portraits of that they don’t have to conform to Hollywood’s beauty standards.
  McCraney said, “Not only has photography helped me support others and find a sense of confidence, but it has also helped me grow as a person.”
  “Because of photography, I’ve met so many different people and it’s opened my horizons. People that I never would’ve thought that I’d spend time with are who I now hang out with. It turns out we have so much in common.” said McCraney.
  “At first I thought photography was a thing for me, but with my camera it’s like ‘Hey, can I snap a picture of you?’ When I have that camera around my neck, it’s like I’m a different person,” said McCraney. “I’m more outgoing and I’ve learned how to handle situations better than I used to.”

As a Youngin’

Photo+courtesy+of+Hans+Torgerson
Photo courtesy of Hans Torgerson

Photo courtesy of Hans Torgerson

Photo courtesy of Hans Torgerson

  Senior Hans Torgerson started rapping at a young age.   According to Torgerson, what got him interested in rap is much different from most people.
  “[I heard] the song ‘Till I Collapse’ by Eminem in a movie trailer,” said Torgerson. “I thought it was the greatest thing ever, and ever since then I’ve just been rapping.”
  “My process differs between each song. Sometimes I find an instrumental beforehand and write bars to it,” said Torgerson.   “Otherwise I’ll start recording a few lines in the studio and feel out the best way to make it as pleasing as possible.”
  “My favorite song I’ve made is definitely something unreleased.
  But of the released songs it’s probably ‘Snakes in the Grass’ or ‘As a Youngin’,’” said Torgerson.
  “I work with Rishi Swami, he’s my manager, as well as my friend Luke Burlow. I also work with other musicians within the school and city,” said Torgerson.
  “Hip hop is closely tied to urban communities but as times shift the dominant audience has become average kids throughout suburbs or cities,” said Torgerson
  “I feel like in the past rappers from the Twin Cities have always copied whatever is popular in rap at the time. Whether it is flows or the beats they rap over, Twin Cities rappers haven’t really made a unique sound. I want to develop my own sound as I get better.”
  According to Torgerson, he feels as though he should pay respect to the greats considering he grew up in a much better environment.
  “Without a doubt my upbringing is drastically different than a typical hip hop artist. As long as you acknowledge your truths and pay homage to the founders of the genre, good music will transcend whatever zip code you’re from,” said Torgerson.
  “Furthermore, as hip hop continues to dominate culture, there’s a much bigger market within the industry for artists in different areas,” said Torgerson. “Whether it’s a suburban kid or a rural kid, almost everyone’s a fan of hip hop these days, so anyone can make hip hop in my opinion.”
  “I think the future for me is to try and make as much art as possible,” said Torgerson. “I definitely want to further develop myself as more a musician than just a rapper.”

The Lone Bass Player

Photo+by+Caroline+Hansen
Photo by Caroline Hansen

Photo by Caroline Hansen

Photo by Caroline Hansen

  Senior Sam Peterson is the only bass player in both Wayzata Chamber Orchestra and Pit Orchestra for four high school musicals.
  “I began playing bass in 6th grade. Lots of people I know started in 3rd grade, but I didn’t have any prior music experience,” said Peterson.
  “I’ve played mostly classical music and Broadway plays, it’s hard to choose between them. The classical music I play in Chamber Orchestra has been more challenging,” said Peterson. “On the other hand, Broadway music is fun to listen to and be a part of, even if it’s not as interesting to actually play.”
  Outside of the music Anderson plays, he usually listens to bands such as Imagine Dragons, American Authors, and Weezer.
  According to Peterson, he prefers to play in small groups, as it is hard to interact with a large amount of musicians.
  “I really want to know the people I’m playing with,” said Peterson. “But I’m also not a fan of solos; most solo bass music is needlessly complicated and just doesn’t sound good.”
  According to Peterson, it is difficult to be “flashy” playing bass due to the lack of music written highlighting the bass player.
  “I won’t be impressing anyone with a two-octave scale, or a melody of a song clearly written for cello,” said Peterson.
  “While the violins and the cellos are trading the melody, I’ll be playing the bassline in back,” said Peterson. “It won’t be fancy, it won’t be beautiful but it’ll be there for everyone else to build on. I’ll be there.”

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