Day of Silence

Students+creating+the+mural+for+the+Day+of+Silence+on+April+21st.+The%0Amural+is+made+to+look+like+Bharat+Pulgam+%2812%29.+Photo+by+Maggie%0AReese.
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Day of Silence

Students creating the mural for the Day of Silence on April 21st. The
mural is made to look like Bharat Pulgam (12). Photo by Maggie
Reese.

Students creating the mural for the Day of Silence on April 21st. The mural is made to look like Bharat Pulgam (12). Photo by Maggie Reese.

Students creating the mural for the Day of Silence on April 21st. The mural is made to look like Bharat Pulgam (12). Photo by Maggie Reese.

Students creating the mural for the Day of Silence on April 21st. The mural is made to look like Bharat Pulgam (12). Photo by Maggie Reese.

Maggie Reese, Staff Writer

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Students began working on the mural months ago to be ready for the Day of Silence. Photo by Maggie Reese.

This year’s Day of Silence, will take place on April 21st.
  “The day is intended to raise awareness about the silencing effect of anti-LGBT harassment, and discrimination,” said Art
Teacher Kate Woolever-Martinez. “Some students stay silent all day (making sure it is pre-approved with teachers) where others do it before school, between classes, and at lunch.”
  “The day is important because it raises attention to the situation. We want to be acknowledged,” said Senior Kass Mossefin.
  Sponsored by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, or GLSEN, the Day of Silence has developed into the biggest student-based movement towards creating safer educational environments for all students, regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation.
  The Day has a history of students participating in all 50 states, along with those in Russia, New Zealand, and Singapore, according to glsen.org.
  “It provides solidarity for those that have been harassed, showing that many are willing to be supportive,” said Mossefin.
  GLSEN’s 2013 National School Climate Survey states that approximately 9 out of 10 LGBT students have experienced harassment in their school environment.

  “I feel it’s important to recognize that those in the community are still bullied even though their rights have increased,” said Junior Grace Sather. “It is still an issue.”
  According to the Minnesota Student Survey for all juniors in Wayzata High School, 3% of males and 2% of females reported
being bullied because sexual orientation or perception of sexual orientation at least once in the past 30 days.
  This year, Pottery 1 students and the GSA worked to create a mural of painted clay tiles in honor of the Day of Silence.
  “Students learned how creating art gives meaning and voice
to further create change,” said Woolever- Martinez. “This collaborative project is intended to invite all students of Wayzata to peacefully participate in the Day to put an end to the bullying.”
  The mural is displayed on first floor hallway right before the Athletic wing.
  “This year has shown a lot of change at the school. Teachers, instead of just putting up a sign, actually vocalize that they’re willing to help,” said Mossefin. “But there’s always room for improvement.”

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