Energy In a Bottle

Energy In a Bottle

Sandy Sugi, Co Health Editor

Sandy Sugi

With school in full swing, people have found numerous ways to stay up later and later. From drinking coffee, to blasting music, to even calling up others to help distract from the tiredness the options have definitely gotten more and more creative over the years it seems.
One option that has been pretty constant though for not only teenagers but adults across the nation as well is the consumption of energy drinks.
What exactly is inside one container of some of the nation’s leading energy drink brands?
Theactivetimes.com health editor Nicole Dossantos states that, “Monster contains around 100 calories, 180 milligrams of sodium, 27 grams of sugar, and is high in vitamin C. While Redbull contains around 110 calories, only about 100 milligrams of sodium, 27 grams of sugar, and is high in Niacin.”
Niacin being a crucial vitamin that helps the body keep low cholesterol levels, states WebMD.
With boatloads of caffeine and caffeine like substances, energy drinks are notorious for contributing to serious health problems such as weight gain, increased blood pressure, and Insomnia…go figure.
Another seriously negative effect of energy drinks is the likelyhood of getting addicted the longer you continue to consume them.
“On a good week I drink about 2 energy drinks a week,” states Wayzata High School senior Alyssa Patil, “but on days where life is more stressful I drink about 4 bottles of Monster.”
Katherine Zeratsky, Mayo Clinic website writer, states that “the longed for ‘energy boost’ that people search for in energy drinks is actually just sugar.”
Lots and lots of sugar.
The abundance of sugar that energy drinks contain has also been found to help lessen the effect of some alcoholic beverages, leading to the creation of spiked energy drinks by some individuals out there.
So, if you thought that energy drinks alone were bad, imagine the harm that they could cause paired with alcohol.
“Mixing energy drinks with alcohol may be even more problematic…this may lead to heavier drinking and alcohol related injuries,” Zeratsky states.
With hardly any nutritional benefits energy drinks are in a sense just bad substitutes for healthier, more natural ways of gaining energy.
If you really want to get that long lasting energy boost try to fit in at least an hour of some form of exercise and get enough sleep each day.
This means not waking up at 5 am each day to finish your homework and not binge watching Netflix before actually getting in bed.
A constant sleep schedule is vital to brain development and refreshing one’s body back to normal after a grueling school day.
Also try to eat some vegetables every now and then.
I know it’s hard sometimes but it really does help. The benefits of having a well balanced diet and not skipping a meal are definitely worthwhile.