Beauty Standards

Beauty Standards

Sandy Sugi, Senior Staff Writer

Sandy Sugi

All this talk of a “war on women” with this year’s political campaign has been a lot to try and make sense of.
Whether this was what Trump had intended to happen, and whether there actually is a “war on women” is debatable.
That being said, the topic of “women” has frequently come up this election.
Apparently, when our nation is too afraid to talk about more serious topics such as terrorism, race relations, police brutality, or an unstable economy, we open up the public discussion to the topic of women.
Specifically, the topic of what women should look like.
Feminine scholars Lori Baker-Sperry of Western Illinois University and Liz Grauerholz of Purdue University describe the feminine beauty ideal as “the socially constructed notion that physical attractiveness is one of women’s most important assets, and something all women should strive to achieve and maintain.”
Let’s face it, we’re a nation that holds physical appearance in high regard and the level of stress that it causes for both men and women is undeniably high.
“Ideals of beauty often reflect the roles women and men are expected to fulfill in a given society,” states Bradley University, “women may be gaining in freedom and power, but are often increasingly encouraged to discipline their bodies through diet and exercise to conform to ideals that are almost impossible to achieve.”
We’re all aware of them; the qualifications that women must meet to be considered truly beautiful in the eyes of the American public.
A girl’s got to have full lips, long billowing hair, nice hips without being too curvy, long legs, and eyebrows must always be “on fleek.”
The requirements go on and on, and in this day and age with the rise of social media, it’s like someone is always showing you what you need to work on to be like the happy and successful people you see on TV.
There isn’t really an easy fix, though I wish that there was, for the problem of beauty standards in America.
Idealistyle.com talks of how the issue of living up to unrealistic beauty standards has been a serious issue in our society since early in American history, “The 50’s were about the extreme opposites of gender roles, with an emphasis on what the perfect woman or man should be.”
The thing to always keep in mind with a problem like this one, would be to not always try and change yourself to appease others.
I honestly feel like sometimes people forget that the terms “pretty”, “beautiful”, and “sexy” are all subjective.
It’s fine for individuals to have their specific ideas of what beauty is to them, we all do, but for any one man or woman or nation to try and promote a single type above all else is not only unhealthy but unethical as well.
No man or woman should have to feel like they aren’t good enough because they don’t quite meet all the criteria that others have set for them.
Calvin Klein supermodel, Lara Stone, has gap teeth and yet made the Forbes top 10 list of earning models for the year 2013 and continues to pave the way for other “unconventional” supermodels on the rise in the American fashion industry.
Hunger Games actress Jennifer Lawrence stands at almost six feet tall, and being considered bigger than most actresses her height in Hollywood, she has certainly received her fair share of public ridicule.
Regardless, Lawrence has gone on to win multiple Academy Awards and has been named the world’s highest paid actress for both the years 2015 and 2016 in the U.S, states Forbes magazine.
Both celebrities being a strong proponent of people, women specifically, learning to embrace and accept the skin they live in.
“You look the way you look. Be comfortable. What are you going to do? Starve yourself everyday to make other people happy? That’s just dumb,” states the 26 year old actress in a 2015 interview with Vogue.
No matter what Trump or any other politician may have to say on the topic of women’s looks this campaign season just always remember this; there is no bar, no limit, nor restriction on what qualifies as beauty.